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MICE
Mice travel over their entire territory daily, investigating each change or new object that may be placed there.

Mice have poor vision, hence their activity patterns rely heavily on smell, taste, touch, and hearing.

Mice use the long sensitive whiskers near the nose and hairs on the body as tactile sensors. The whiskers and hairs
enable the mouse to travel in the dark, adjacent to walls in burrows.

Mice also have an excellent sense of balance, enabling them to walk along telephone wires, ropes and similar thin
objects.

Mice are excellent jumpers, capable of leaping at least 12 inches vertically.

Mice can jump against a flat vertical surface using it as a spring board to gain additional height.

They can run up almost any vertical surface; wood, brick, weathered sheet metal, cables, etc.

They can easily travel for some distance hanging upside down.
Although they are good swimmers, mice tend to take to water only if left with no other alternative.

Mice are basically nocturnal in nature.

House mice breed throughout the year and can become pregnant within 48 hours of producing a litter.
There are usually about 6 mice to a litter and females may produce as many as ten litters (about 50 young) per year.

It takes 18 to 21 days for gestation, and 35 days for a mouse to mature. Most mice live anywhere from 15 to 18 months.

They make their nests out of the same types of soft materials as rats, and as many as 3 females may use the same
nest.

They commonly nest in insulation in attics, also in stoves and under refrigerators.
Mice normally feed 15 to 20 times per day and will eat pretty much anything a human will eat.

Food preference is cereal or seed, but also gnaw through insulation or wires, sheet rock, storage boxes, etc.
Mice are nibblers. They do small amounts of damage to many food items in "home range", rather than doing extensive
damage to any one item.

While mice are nibblers and feed many times in many places, they have two main feeding periods, at dusk and just
before dawn.

They have to consume about 10% to 15% of their body weight every 24 hours and require extremely small amounts of
water.

Mice droppings sometimes are confused with droppings from the larger species of roaches, such as the American
roach.

Mice droppings are smooth with pointed ends, and are 1/8th to 1/4 inch long.

In six months, one pair of mice can eat about 4 pounds of food and during that period produce some 18,000 fecal
droppings.
Mice droppings sometimes are confused with droppings from the larger species of roaches, such as the American
roach.

Mice droppings are smooth with pointed ends, and are 1/8th to 1/4 inch long.

In six months, one pair of mice can eat about 4 pounds of food and during that period produce some 18,000 fecal
droppings.

Deer mice are a primary vector of Hantaviral infections which cause hemorrhagic fevers.

Mice may infect food with their droppings transmitting such organisms as salmonella and the microscopic eggs of
tapeworms.

Mice transmit disease in a number of ways including biting, infecting human food with their droppings or urine,
indirectly via the dog or cat and bloodsucking insects.

The most common way mice transmit disease organisms is by contaminating food with their droppings and/or urine.
The most threatening organism spread by mice is Salmonella, a cause of food poisoning, spread via droppings.
Other transmittable organisms include tapeworms via droppings, rat-bite fever via bites, infectious
jaundice/leptospirosis/Weil’s Disease via urine in food or water, a fungus disease (Favus) of the scalp either by direct
contact or indirectly via cats, plague and murine typhus via fleas, Rickettsial pox via the mite Liponyssoides
sanguineus (Hirst), lymphocytic choriomeningitis via droppings, and possibly poliomyelitis (polio). Another problem is
house mouse mite dermatitis which is caused by these mites when they feed on humans.

Mice and rats transmit diseases to poultry, hogs and other animals. They consume and contaminate feed, and their
constant gnawing causes extensive structural damage to buildings, including fires. All resulting in financial losses to
you.

To compound the problem, rats and mice breed at an alarming rate. Livestock and other farm facilities provide ideal
conditions for rodents to breed with abundant supplies of food, water and harborage. A small population of rodents,
left unchecked, could explode to thousands in just a few months
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